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View Full Version : Looking at this.....drooling.



Boo
02-03-2014, 10:26 AM
I'm interested in making an offer on this. It's right around the block from me.

http://longisland.craigslist.org/pts/4283272243.html

I just don't know how long it would last in my driveway, weather-wise.
I have no garage. :(

Greasy DeLorean Mechanic
02-03-2014, 11:33 AM
Just weather protect the electric motors. I've got outdoor covers over the air compressor (electric) and the welder/generator in my service truck. The rest of the lift will be fine.

At least you don't live down south, where the Sun destroys outdoor covers within 3-5 years. I've spent thousands of dollars over the years replacing car and equipments covers, flags, etc.

Bill Robertson
#5939

Boo
02-03-2014, 12:00 PM
What about the cables and pulleys?

Greasy DeLorean Mechanic
02-03-2014, 12:24 PM
They should be coated in grease.

Bill Robertson
#5939

Boo
02-03-2014, 12:25 PM
Yeah but the contact areas would wear
Slightly then rust, no?

Greasy DeLorean Mechanic
02-03-2014, 12:34 PM
Old fashioned sling lift tow trucks had exposed cables. Truck mounted jib cranes are rarely covered. Nearly all roll back cable winches are exposed. Etc.

Bill Robertson
#5939

Boo
02-03-2014, 01:02 PM
You do have a point there Bill.

Greasy DeLorean Mechanic
02-03-2014, 01:48 PM
Airborne beach salt is probably a bigger threat than rainwater.

I would try to keep it out of the motor assemblies because as you found out with your window motor, they don't handle rust well (tiny little bearings).

Pulley bearings should be much heavier duty. May even come with zerk fittings.

Bill Robertson
#5939

Boo
02-03-2014, 03:11 PM
Well there sure is enough airborne salt in my driveway!
I'm batting a thousand here.

4359
02-04-2014, 01:12 AM
LPS3 in an aerosol can will sort out your troubles with the pulleys and cables. Just respray every other year and you'll be fine.

OverlandMan
02-04-2014, 09:21 AM
I'm interested in making an offer on this. It's right around the block from me.

http://longisland.craigslist.org/pts/4283272243.html

I just don't know how long it would last in my driveway, weather-wise.
I have no garage. :(

When I have more room (at my next residence) I will have something like this. I'm drooling too.

Greasy DeLorean Mechanic
02-04-2014, 09:49 AM
When I have more room (at my next residence) I will have something like this. I'm drooling too.

[Voice of experience: buy your next residence *OUTSIDE* city limits (don't forget the ETJ). You may have to put up with a hog farm or two (or three or four), but at least you won't have a bunch of persnickety zoning requirements to contend with.]

Jeff Dickey has a lift very similar to this, but I think his wheels are removable. The lift picks itself up off the floor so he can simply push it around. Came up with an ingenuous use for the thing: used it to raise a bridge sized I beam (no joke: the beam is *HUGE*) to add a second floor in his garage.

Bill Robertson
#5939

Duplicate Account
02-04-2014, 10:43 AM
[Voice of experience: buy your next residence *OUTSIDE* city limits (don't forget the ETJ). You may have to put up with a hog farm or two (or three or four), but at least you won't have a bunch of persnickety zoning requirements to contend with.]

Jeff Dickey has a lift very similar to this, but I think his wheels are removable. The lift picks itself up off the floor so he can simply push it around. Came up with an ingenuous use for the thing: used it to raise a bridge sized I beam (no joke: the beam is *HUGE*) to add a second floor in his garage.

Bill Robertson
#5939

wow that is a good idea. I remember my dad using a motor lift and wooden blocks to raise the beam in his old garage. I'd like to know the make/model of Mr. Dickeys lift.

4359
02-04-2014, 10:55 AM
The pictures are a bit shaky but here are a few shots from when I hung the i-beam:

http://www.wheresmyjeffdickey.com/images/ibeam/ibeam-20.JPG

you can see the wheels - there are pegs on the vertical posts that the wheels slip under. The weight of the ramps levers the posts up from the floor about 2".
http://www.wheresmyjeffdickey.com/images/ibeam/ibeam-23.JPG

As I recall, mine is an Eagle branded lift. I bought it from a vendor in Ohio after finding it on ebay. I paid $2200 for it back in 2003 and it came with the dolly kit, a center jack support that slides between the ramps and three drip trays. It is rated at 7000lbs but the ramps are not long enough for a 1958 Cadillac hearse. Which sucks because I really liked that hearse and hated to sell it.

Boo
02-05-2014, 04:43 PM
When I inquired about the lift last night, the owner stated that it was sold already. Oh well, the search continues. I actually remember my old mechanic (do most work myself now) said last year that he knew of 2 post lifts for around $700-900. But a two post lift , I know they are used all over but I'm afraid of it being tippy front to rear. I know I'll have to place studs into the driveway concrete, but even still, I dunno, especially storing a car that way. It gets real windy around here.

4359
02-05-2014, 08:17 PM
There are minimums to what pressure concrete and depth you can work with for a two post. Back when I was looking at them, I recall most of the 7000lb models required something like 3000psi at 4" thick and at least 18" from any edge. If I ever got a two post, I'd spec a 10,000lb model and cut out a 3'x3'x3' foot hole for each post. For each post hole, I'd have rebar throughout and 36" long J bolts. At a cubic yard for each post, I wouldn't feel any less safe than I do under my current four post.