PDA

View Full Version : Winter/Short Term Storage - Post Your Techniques Here!



NightFlyer
11-19-2013, 12:47 AM
I haven't put #1798 away for winter hibernation quite yet, but I'm getting ready!

Today, I drove the tank down to fumes, added a can of SeaFoam and 8.5 gallons of ethanol free 90 octane Sunoco, and then drove the 48 miles home. This is the last tank (not full) of fuel for the season - if I get a few more miles in before the salters come out to play, it would be nice, but I think that the SeaFoam blended 6 remaining gallons of ethanol free fuel should also sit just fine over the winter without worrying about draining the tank / purging the system.

I also recently changed the oil/filter not more than 275 miles ago.

So, my fuel and oil situation is set and ready for storage!

When I do finally park her for a 3-5 month slumber, I'll jack her 3 feet in the air and rest her on four carpet covered jack stands, remove the wheels/tires (which will be stored in the temperature/humidity controlled basement), remove the battery (which will be hooked up to a smart battery tender in the basement), fully clean/detail her from undercarriage to t-panel, treat all accessible rubber pieces, cake a decent layer of 303 Aerospace Protectant on all vinyl surfaces in the interior, cake a decent layer of Leatherique on all leather surfaces in the interior and garbage bag the seats and steering wheel, place three open boxes of baking soda in the interior (one each on the opposing sides of the floor pan and one on the parcel shelf), and cover the car with my DMCH custom fit car cover.

So, now that everyone is familiar with my technique, let's hear yours - post 'em here :)

Josh
11-19-2013, 04:37 AM
Well, I am doing nothing at all. The car has no fluids in it (coolant, oil, transmission fluid) and the tires are already slightly low pressure, lol. When it is running I will just be using fuel stabilizer on a half full tank, go for a good drive to get everything circulated, park it in the garage, and remove the battery.

Boglin
11-19-2013, 04:47 PM
I do nothing differently. Then again, it only snows about twice a year here.

stevedmc
11-20-2013, 10:22 AM
I do nothing differently either. I usually just drive the snot out of it. lol

Dracula
11-20-2013, 02:28 PM
My system is nowhere near as intense.

I drive the tank as low as possible, pour in a can of Sea Foam, and drive until I'm sure that it's been circulated throughout every system. Then, I park the car and remove the battery.

When summer comes, I bring a can of fresh gas and the battery and add them where they are needed. I vacuum and clean the car prior to storage and will condition the leather at the start of summer, as I don't want anything staying on the car all winter long with no airflow; I've seen it etch and discolor leathers.

I prefer to keep the car uncovered for fear of moisture that they trap, as there's nothing in the area that could fall on it and, if the roof collapses, the cover would be just as pointless.

I've never removed tires from any car, nor have I ever elevated the car to relieve the suspension; I've heard that exposing extra shock absorber metal can cause them to become rusty internally and fail quicker, though that may be justification of my laziness.

Boo
11-20-2013, 07:11 PM
I would just advise the use of STA-BIL in the gas for storage. Knowing how these things are with fuel clogs and the new ethanol requirement in most, if not all, states. (Although I may be a little less prone to fuel clog issues being Boo is carberated)
I don't elevate anything I just put STA-BIL in the gas and run it for awhile, and disconnect the positive lead and put a 4.99$ float charger from harbor freight on the battery. (I have two other float chargers I use for my boat batterys) Oh, and I use it, or at least run it, every now and then if I can.

Greasy DeLorean Mechanic
11-20-2013, 09:05 PM
When I was unemployed the first time (2004-2006) I took #5939 out of service and turned its tag in as a cost savings measure. Didn't do a single thing otherwise (didn't even put a charger on the battery) -- just parked it in the back yard. July 2006 I bought a new battery, new license plate, and fired the car back up on the gas that was still in the tank. Tires may have had had minor flat spots, but they rounded back out with use.

Bill Robertson
#5939

Duplicate Account
11-21-2013, 08:46 PM
when its cold, critters are looking to get warm and cozy in your car and chew on your wires. Get a good one of these.

1080

djdogbone
11-23-2013, 10:19 AM
COld weather is arriving so I'll probably be driving the DMC less. Any tips on winterizing the car? My csr is garage kept and the garage is attached so it stays fairly warm.

Josh
11-23-2013, 11:45 AM
http://dmctoday.com/showthread.php?433-Winter-Short-Term-Storage-Post-Your-Techniques-Here!

Doogie
11-23-2013, 10:46 PM
I always like to start my car and let it run every now and again when a sunny winter day comes out. If it's dry outside I might run it around the block real quick just to "stir the gas".

I also have a 1922 Model T Ford. It has a gravity feed fuel system, with the carb being the lowest part. 2 years ago I was surprised that I couldn't get the car started right away after sitting for about 2-3 months. Cranked and cranked and cranked. NEVER did this before. I drained the carb into a glass jar (really easy to do on a Model T with a carb drain valve! :-) )and was shocked to see brown dirty liquid. Drained a pint, got back in car, started right up. I've had this car for 10 years, never did that before. Someone on the Model T forum wondered aloud about a possible change in gasoline formulation that year.

Lesson learned I thought was to at least "circulate" (Delorean) or "burn off the bad stuff' (Model T) every couple weeks.

I use Sta-Bil too in the Model T. Might throw some in the Delorean this time.

Greasy DeLorean Mechanic
11-24-2013, 09:05 AM
No road salt down here so the car stays in service year 'round.

My biggest issue is the door struts. Even brand new ones from Houston simply have no cold temperature horsepower. I'm trying to buy a set from John, but you know that goes. I've done the automated website order. If my credit card still hasn't been charged by next month I will call him, but that never goes well (he still blames me for "stealing business" with my tuna fish baffles, never mind that every owner who got one also got an intake manifold, carburetor, custom fuel pump and filter brackets, etc -- things he does not even sell).

Perhaps I should get one of you to buy them on my behalf then reship them to me -- that's how people used to get around Ed Bernstein's VIN black list).

Bill Robertson
#5939

djdogbone
11-24-2013, 09:47 AM
Thanks for the link!

DMC5180
11-24-2013, 03:37 PM
I always like to start my car and let it run every now and again when a sunny winter day comes out. If it's dry outside I might run it around the block real quick just to "stir the gas".

I also have a 1922 Model T Ford. It has a gravity feed fuel system, with the carb being the lowest part. 2 years ago I was surprised that I couldn't get the car started right away after sitting for about 2-3 months. Cranked and cranked and cranked. NEVER did this before. I drained the carb into a glass jar (really easy to do on a Model T with a carb drain valve! :-) )and was shocked to see brown dirty liquid. Drained a pint, got back in car, started right up. I've had this car for 10 years, never did that before. Someone on the Model T forum wondered aloud about a possible change in gasoline formulation that year.

Lesson learned I thought was to at least "circulate" (Delorean) or "burn off the bad stuff' (Model T) every couple weeks.

I use Sta-Bil too in the Model T. Might throw some in the Delorean this time.

Does that Model-T have cast iron carburetor? If so you are likely seeing rust and dirt from the inside the bowl including the gas tank along with condensation (water) from sitting long periods. The water always collects at the lowest point. Does it have a visible glass bowl fuel strainer? I'd highly recommend you pull the bowl if possible and take a look inside. you may surprised at the crap inside. The other thing you should do is shut the fuel supply OFF if there is a valve and drain the Carb for long term (seasonal storage. Lessons learned from having Antique tractors that seldom get run.


As for winter storage for the Delorean, Well I'll admit I'm pretty Lazy on this. I've never done anything special beyond disconnecting the battery. 19 years and fires right up every spring after 4-5 months and that's with 10% Oxygenated fuel. Of coarse now that I said that it probably won't this spring :-)

Dracula
11-30-2013, 05:08 PM
Here's a picture of my two cars that are in need of storage:

1114

The rest are either disassembled, at shops where storage isn't a concern, or parked in the back yard.

They all have fuel stabilizer in their tanks; if they HAVE fuel tanks installed, that is, and are eagerly waiting on summer.